Mattel WWE


WWE Elite – Series 10
R-Truth
7 Inch Scale
By: Mattel
$15.99

What’s up? What’s up? What’s up? R-Truth is what’s up. Ron “The Truth” Killings is one of the few WWE superstars that actually made his name in TNA Wrestling. I actually recall seeing R-Truth in Memphis doing his K-Krush gimmick before eventually he did a brief and ultimately doomed stint as K-Kwik in WWF. Ron Killings fashions himself a rapper, which hasn’t always worked well in the world of wrestling.


He soon joined TNA, where he developed his “Truth” persona and went on to have a great deal of success as both a heel and a face. He even won the NWA World Championship, one of the few African Americans in history to do so. Eventually WWE came calling again and despite their best efforts, Killings, now dubbed R-Truth, got over huge, In fact I’d say there was a point where he was the second or third most over man on the entire roster. Of course, he was subsequently de-pushed and he’s back to being a midcard act now, but a couple years ago it looked like R-Truth was going to be WWE Champion.

Packaging:
The packaging is the standard Elite style with a double sided window box. This is one of the last packages that looked like this, as it changed in Elite Series 12. Truth was recently re-releases with slightly different attire and deco, in the newer cards.


The back of the package has the faux autograph and talks about his rapping stuff. No big surprise there. This figure actually came out as R-Truth was just turning heel, but it reflects his face persona. Back when he was trying to appeal to all the little Jimmys in the crowd.

Sculpt/Paint:
This was the second Elite R-Truth figure from Mattel (and he’s since had another) and represents one of those mind boggling choices in a lot of ways. When this figure was slated for production, R-Truth was treading water and was essentially, a nobody. So why did he have two Elites? Who knows. It worked out for Mattel though, as R-Truth’s career took off like a rocket right around the time this figure hit, making it one of the harder to find figures in Series 10.


On the surface this looks a lot like the previous Elite R-Truth. He’s got a shirt, pants and he’s really dark. R-Truth is really dark in real life though. Seriously, the guy is so black that even the night thinks he’s dark.


But underneath is a new body mold. The previous figures had used the “Triple H/Batista” body mold which made R-Truth look way too pumped. R-Truth is muscular, but not THAT muscular. This is a great fit for him.


The head sculpt is also quite good, with no goofy grins or anything. Usually Mattel puts a really dopey head sculpt on the Elite figures, so that you have to buy a Basic figure to swap with. The nice thing here is that they included paint work for all of R-Truth’s piercings and such. It’s a nice job all around.


There’s a ton of detail work all over him with paint apps on his belt, his wrists, his pants and other places. It’s all sharp and clean and it’s not all tampos either. Although he has a fair share of them as well. He also has a nice little sculpted on necklace that could possibly be removed by removing his head, as well as fabric wrist bands that can be removed.

Articulation:
R-Truth has the usual Elite articulation. The complete breakdown is a ball neck, swivel-hinged shoulders, swivel biceps, hinged elbows, swivel-hinged wrists, ab crunch, ball hips, swivel thighs, double-hinged knees, swivel boot tops, hinged ankles, and ankle rockers.


This will satisfy even the most annoying Little Jimmy. The legs work well enough that you can his axe kick.


The figure retains a great use of balance and can be posed easily and freely. There’s just no denying that the WWE Elites are Mattel’s best toys on the market right now. Those rocker ankles for example, really help them to stand while posing.

Accessories:
Elite figures have mixed results when it comes to accessories. They’re supposed to come with stuff, but sometimes the crap they come with isn’t all that interesting.


Truth comes with a microphone and a t-shirt. He also has the aforementioned necklace and wrist bands, though I consider that more of a key part of the figure, akin to a kneepad though. Since they’re removable, I guess they are technically accessories to some folks.


The microphone is essential for Truth, because without it, he couldn’t spread his paranoia. Later versions of this figure come with his bullet proof vest. That is a bit missed here.


The shirt looks great from the front, but a little clunky in the back. That’s okay though, I suppose. I prefer the fabric shirts to the plastic ones. Thankfully the Truth is so black that he doesn’t have to worry about any of the fabric ink getting onto his skin cause you wouldn’t be able to notice it anyway! The shirt is fastened with velcro in the back.

Value:
If you can get this guy for $15.99 or on sale, he’s a pretty darn good value these days. I think the price has since went up on Elites though. These figures are good, but not worth too much more than that. As they hover closer to the $20 range, you may be a bit more choosey on who you select. I’ve always found R-Truth to be pretty entertaining, especially his heel runs, so I’m glad to have him in the collection.


Score Recap:
Packaging – 8
Sculpting – 8
Paint – 8
Articulation – 8
Accessories – Microphone, Shirt
Value – 8
Overall – 8 out of 10


Another Mattel WWE Elite that comes away with a pretty good score. I have no real complaints about R-Truth. If he’d come with a couple more accessories, like a chair and maybe his vest, I’d have no problems pushing this guy up to a 9 or so. As is, he’s really one of the better WWE Elite figures out there. No goofy head sculpt, good posing, accurate outfit and body. It’s a great small version of the real like R-Truth.

You can get with this or you can get with that, but you better get with this cause this is where it’s at… What’s up?!

Big Bossman Flashback Review at Infinite Hollywood
WWE Elite – Series 14 “Flashback”
Big Bossman
7 Inch Scale
By: Mattel
$15.99

When Mattel decided to cancel the WWE Legends line because of their poor handling of it low sales, they promised to fans that they would find an avenue for the Legends. First some exclusives would come to MattyCollector and then they announced the Flashbacks. This is a way to insert a figure or two of an era gone by, on the shelves with the likes of today’s current stars (AKA non-stop John Cena and Randy Orton figures).

It’s not a bad idea and when the Big Bossman was announced, I was overjoyed. Mostly because it was classic Big Bossman. Jakks had previously made quite a few Big Bossman figures. Bossman was still an active competitor when Jakks took over the WWE line in the late 90’s and saw numerous figures released. Unfortunately they were all “current” as Jakks hadn’t quite figured out that people might want to buy figures of wrestler’s previous outfits and gimmicks.

Twin Towers Big Bossman Infinite Hollywood

Flash forward a few years and right at the tail end of the Jakks run, they finally tackled a new Bossman figure in their WWE Classics line. Sadly, Ray Traylor had passed away a few years before and for some reason Jakks never went after his estate for a updated figure. However when they did, everyone wanted a classic “prison guard” outfit Bossman. Jakks promised big things, delivering not one but two Bossman figures in both his SWAT gear and his cop gear. Unfortunately both figures were sub par thanks to cost cutting and a bloated head sculpt.

However here comes Mattel to save the day! This figure flew under the radar as no prototypes were leaked and it came as something of a surprise. You may remember when I reviewed Akeem I mentioned how it was odd that Bossman wasn’t in the works to go with Akeem. Well apparently, he was. So is this figure ready to serve hard time?

Packaging:
The packaging is a revamp of the standard Elite style window box. In Elite Series 12, Mattel changed the Elite packaging so that it no longer was a double window box. This is similar to the new packages, but is adorned with “Flashback” graphics.


There’s also a nice little graphic mentioning that this is the Big Bossman’s “first time in the line” as well as his usual bio information. Big Bossman’s bio talks about his infamous cage match with Hogan which was one of the best cage matches in the WWF of the era. It also name drops Koko B. Ware and Brother Love. Pretty sweet for a bio from this brand these days. The rest of the figures in the series are also shown off, including Flashback King Booker.

Sculpt/Paint:
The Big Bossman has proven hard to capture in a likeness for one reason or another. The old WWF Hasbro figure actually had a pretty great likeness for it’s time, but everything since has been a bit of a mixed bag. Mattel’s attempt at the Bossman shines in some regards and is just okay in others.


To begin with, the head sculpt is nice, but hardly spot on. It’s just a soft sculpt in general. If Ray Traylor was alive, Mattel could have given him a digital head scan.


Unfortunately he’s no longer with us, so it was up to Mattel’s in house sculpting team to do the work. It’s not a terrible head sculpt, but it’s not the strongest in the line, either. That said it’s better than Jakks last effort.


Thankfully the rest of the figure is so magnificent that the slightly weak head sculpt is made up for. The costume is loaded down with details and it’s an all unique sculpt, as it should be.


Big Bossman’s weight fluctuated through the years. Traylor was always a big man, but when he came to WWF in the early 80’s, Vince McMahon actually encouraged him to get fatter. He wanted Bossman to be a “fat pig” that fans could hate. Bossman at times ballooned up to the point that he looked like he was 400+ pounds!


This seems to be a take on Bossman during his face run, which is where he had his most success and spent a good portion of his career. By that point he was much leaner and only carried around a little bulk with him.


Mattel has went all out, sculpting new pants, a new shirt torso with pockets and even sculpting his black strap across his attire. They have left no stone unturned and for a line that prides itself on being able to reuse and reuse, the Bossman is a breath of fresh air.


The one minor quibble I would have is that he doesn’t have his Rebel flag insignia, but I suppose that would be too controversial these days.


The paint work is sharp, with nice tampo work on the shirt as well. The one area that seems a little sloppy is the yellow line running down his pants. The paint used on that just isn’t as good as the rest of the figure and I could see that rubbing off with extended play.

Articulation:
Despite his pants and shirt attire, Bossman retains all the normal articulation and has a ball neck, swivel-hinged shoulders, swivel biceps, hinged elbows, swivel-hinged wrists, ab crunch, ball hips, swivel thighs, double-hinged knees, swivel boot tops, hinged ankles, and ankle rockers.


Bossman is quite poseable, but his girth does restrict his movement just a tad.


If anything the pants and fat crotch mold are the culprits. This will limit his kicks some, but that’s to be expected with a figure like this. He can do his big belly flop from the old NES Wrestlemania Challenge game, though, and that’s more than enough for me!

Accessories:
The Big Bossman comes absolutely loaded down with accessories.


First and foremost, he has his shades. Bossman was known for wearing his big 80’s “cop ” glasses. These became such a style that they were always referred to as “Bossmans” in my neck of the woods. A tribute to the character’s popularity. The sunglasses aren’t perfect at this scale, but looks surprisingly good with them on from the front. It also helps cover up a bit of the weak head sculpt.


The Big Bossman also has his trademark nightstick. Without this, no Bossman figure is complete.


Bossman also has a pair of handcuffs, that are made of rubber and work fairly well.


Finally he gets a ball and chain, which he used from time to time. It’s the oddest of the accessories, but hey, it’s right there part of his theme music.

Value:
I preordered this guy through Ringside Collectibles and I’ve had him for months. I was going to be the first guy on the internet to review the Bossman, but alas I got distracted, sort of lost interest in the WWE line and moved on. The point of all this? I paid over $30 for this guy to get him early. I wondered if that was going to be a mistake and if I’d see him clogging shelves for the retail price of $15.99 or so…

But it turns out I made a good call! I haven’t seen the Bossman on the shelves at all. In fact I’ve seen next to nothing from this wave at retail. Even though it should have been in stores for months. That’s not a good sign for the line in general, but it makes me feel like I made a good purchase anyway.


Score Recap:
Packaging – 8
Sculpting – 8
Paint – 8
Articulation – 8
Accessories – Nightstick, Handcuffs, Sunglasses, Ball & Chain
Value – 8
Overall – 8 out of 10


Ready for action…

I’m inclined to give this guy a 9 out of 10, but I couldn’t find anything specifically to bump up on his score. This is a really solid entry into the WWE “Legends” line and I hope that we continue to get figures of this quality. Mattel really stepped up their ball game here and gave the Bossman a fitting tribute.


Now I just need a Big Bubba Rogers!

Big Bossman Flashback Review at Infinite Hollywood

WWE Elite – Series 14 “Flashback”

Big Bossman

7 Inch Scale

By: Mattel

$15.99


When Mattel decided to cancel the WWE Legends line because of their poor handling of it low sales, they promised to fans that they would find an avenue for the Legends. First some exclusives would come to MattyCollector and then they announced the Flashbacks. This is a way to insert a figure or two of an era gone by, on the shelves with the likes of today’s current stars (AKA non-stop John Cena and Randy Orton figures).

It’s not a bad idea and when the Big Bossman was announced, I was overjoyed. Mostly because it was classic Big Bossman. Jakks had previously made quite a few Big Bossman figures. Bossman was still an active competitor when Jakks took over the WWE line in the late 90’s and saw numerous figures released. Unfortunately they were all “current” as Jakks had quite figured out that people might want to buy figures of wrestler’s previous outfits and gimmicks.

Twin Towers Big Bossman Infinite Hollywood


Flash forward a few years and right at the tail end of the Jakks run, they finally tackled a new Bossman figure in their WWE Classics line. Sadly, Ray Traylor had passed away a few years before and for some reason Jakks never went after his estate for a updated figure. However when they did, everyone wanted a classic “prison guard” outfit Bossman. Jakks promised big things, delivering not one but two Bossman figures in both his SWAT gear and his cop gear. Unfortunately both figures were subpar thanks to cost cutting and a bloated head sculpt.

However here comes Mattel to save the day! This figure flew under the radar as no prototypes were leaked and it came as something of a surprise. You may remember when I reviewed Akeem I mentioned how it was odd that Bossman wasn’t in the works to go with Akeem. Well apparently, he was. So is this figure ready to serve hard time?



Packaging:

The packaging is a revamp of the standard Elite style window box. In Elite Series 12, Mattel changed the Elite packaging so that it no longer was a double window box. This is similar to the new packages, but is adorned with “Flashback” graphics.



There’s also a nice little graphic mentioning that this is the Big Bossman’s “first time in the line” as well as his usual bio information. Big Bossman’s bio talks about his infamous cage match with Hogan which was one of the best cage matches in the WWF of the era. It also name drops Koko B. Ware and Brother Love. Pretty sweet for a bio from this brand these days. The rest of the figures in the series are also shown off, including Flashback King Booker.

Sculpt/Paint:

The Big Bossman has proven hard to capture in a likeness for one reason or another. The old WWF Hasbro figure actually had a pretty great likeness for it’s time, but everything since has been a bit of a mixed bag. Mattel’s attempt at the Bossman shines in some regards and is just okay in others.



To begin with, the head sculpt is nice, but hardly spot on. It’s just a soft sculpt in general. If Ray Traylor was alive, Mattel could have given him a digital head scan.



Unfortunately he’s no longer with us, so it was up to Mattel’s in house sculpting team to do the work. It’s not a terrible head sculpt, but it’s not the strongest in the line, either. That said it’s better than Jakks last effort.



Thankfully the rest of the figure is so magnificent that the slightly weak head sculpt is made up for. The costume is loaded down with details and it’s an all unique sculpt, as it should be.



Big Bossman’s weight fluctuated through the years. Traylor was always a big man, but when he came to WWF in the early 80’s, Vince McMahon actually encouraged him to get fatter. He wanted Bossman to be a “fat pig” that fans could hate. Bossman at times ballooned up to the point that he looked like he was 400+ pounds!



This seems to be a take on Bossman during his face run, which is where he had his most success and spent a good portion of his career. By that point he was much leaner and only carried around a little bulk with him.



Mattel has went all out, sculpting new pants, a new shirt torso with pockets and even sculpting his black strap across his attire. They have left no stone unturned and for a line that prides itself on being able to reuse and reuse, the Bossman is a breath of fresh air.



The one minor quibble I would have is that he doesn’t have his Rebel flag insignia, but I suppose that would be too controversial these days.



The paint work is sharp, with nice tampo work on the shirt as well. The one area that seems a little sloppy is the yellow line running down his pants. The paint used on that just isn’t as good as the rest of the figure and I could see that rubbing off with extended play.

Articulation:

Despite his pants and shirt attire, Bossman retains all the normal articulation and has a ball neck, swivel-hinged shoulders, swivel biceps, hinged elbows, swivel-hinged wrists, ab crunch, ball hips, swivel thighs, double-hinged knees, swivel boot tops, hinged ankles, and ankle rockers.



Bossman is quite poseable, but his girth does restrict his movement just a tad.



If anything the pants and fat crotch mold are the culprits. This will limit his kicks some, but that’s to be expected with a figure like this. He can do his big belly flop from the old NES Wrestlemania Challenge game, though, and that’s more than enough for me!

Accessories:

The Big Bossman comes absolutely loaded down with accessories.



First and foremost, he has his shades. Bossman was known for wearing his big 80’s “cop ” glasses. These became such a style that they were always referred to as “Bossmans” in my neck of the woods. A tribute to the character’s popularity. The sunglasses aren’t perfect at this scale, but looks surprisingly good with them on from the front. It also helps cover up a bit of the weak head sculpt.



The Big Bossman also has his trademark nightstick. Without this, no Bossman figure is complete.



Bossman also has a pair of handcuffs, that are made of rubber and work fairly well.



Finally he gets a ball and chain, which he used from time to time. It’s the oddest of the accessories, but hey, it’s right there part of his theme music.

Value:

I preordered this guy through Ringside Collectibles and I’ve had him for months. I was going to be the first guy on the internet to review the Bossman, but alas I got distracted, sort of lost interest in the WWE line and moved on. The point of all this? I paid over $30 for this guy to get him early. I wondered if that was going to be a mistake and if I’d see him clogging shelves for the retail price of $15.99 or so…

But it turns out I made a good call! I haven’t seen the Bossman on the shelves at all. In fact I’ve seen next to nothing from this wave at retail. Even though it should have been in stores for months. That’s not a good sign for the line in general, but it makes me feel like I made a good purchase anyway.



Score Recap:

Packaging – 8

Sculpting – 8

Paint – 8

Articulation – 8

Accessories – Nightstick, Handcuffs, Sunglasses, Ball & Chain

Value – 8

Overall – 8 out of 10



Ready for action…


I’m inclined to give this guy a 9 out of 10, but I couldn’t find anything specifically to bump up on his score. This is a really solid entry into the WWE “Legends” line and I hope that we continue to get figures of this quality. Mattel really stepped up their ball game here and gave the Bossman a fitting tribute.



Now I just need a Big Bubba Rogers!


WWE Basic Survivor Series Heritage
Big Show
7 Inch Scale
By: Mattel
$10

I’ve already written at length about the Big Show, so I’ll spare you a recap. Instead I’ll point out that Mattel started doing something rather clever with their WWE basics line by offering up “Heritage” series in which they can offer up classic versions of wrestlers they already have signed to contracts.


It’s a really novel idea, although Mattel hasn’t really used this to the best of their ability. Some of the figures they have made aren’t of characters that old. Sometimes it seems like a waste. Especially if it’s going to yet another John Cena figure. This Survivor Series Heritage Big Show is an interesting choice as well. While he does look significantly different than the most recent Big Show, I’m not sure if this is what I’d consider a classic Big Show.


If I had been Mattel, I would have made a Big Show from earlier in his WWE career, back when he was feuding with Austin. On a side note, that should have been an awesome feud. It’s a shame the WWE weren’t willing to do more with Big Show back then. Regardless, he’s a classic throwback basic figure.

Packaging:
The packaging here is pretty bland if I’m to be honest. It does feature a nice shot of the Big Show from the era on it. The light blue tones are decent and do help it stand out from the other more current offerings on the shelf, but it’s not a visually stunning or eye catching package.


The back of the package shows off the other figures in the series and has a bigger classic picture of the Big Show, along with a facsimile of an autograph.

Sculpt/Paint:
This is not the first Big Show to use this body sculpt, but it actually hasn’t been on shelves in some time. The very first Big Show figure from Mattel had this body, but subsequent ones used the “two strap” singlet mold that Show changed to shortly after Mattel took over the license. In a way that makes this figure feel a bit fresher, even though it is a reuse.


Of course the draw here is the classic head. This is from 2005, which really doesn’t seem like that long ago, but I guess it is. It seems like Big Show has been bald forever, but back in ’05 he still had a fair amount of hair. He was also rocking a bit of an Amish guy beard, which this figure reflects.


The face sculpt is nice and pretty fitting for the era and match this is supposed to be. Although he is missing some wrist tape and an elbow pad. I could skip the wrist tape as Big Show rarely wore that even if he did at Survivor Series, but the elbow pad would have been nice.


Show has all his tattoos and believe it or not, since more skin is exposed, he has more tattoo applications than his most recent Elite figure.


He even has his original tattoo, which was the first one I ever recall seeing on him, even back in the WCW Giant days. It’s a TKE or Tau Kappa Epsilon tattoo. Nice attention to detail from Mattel.


Big Show has a lot of tattoos. It’s also interesting that they gave him all his tats, but didn’t give him chest hair. It’s kind of odd who gets chest hair paint applications and who doesn’t.


The detail on these things is superb. I was checking this tattoo out up close. It’s this cool image of a cat lady with a big tiger. Big Show must like tigers or something. I bet he eats them.


The tattoos have slightly less color than the Elite version, but I can’t actually see color missing. It just looks more faded.


I actually think the faded ones look a bit more realistic, as in real life his tattoos look lighter than the Elite figure probably has them. Another nice thing is that these figures are scaled the same as the Elites. Unlike Jakks who had two different scales for their better articulated figures. This means you can mix and match with all the figures and not have any scale issues.

Articulation:
Basic figures emulate the old WWE Jakks Ruthless Aggression style of articulation. They do have an additional ankle swivel, but it’s not much to make you notice that much of a difference.


The range of motion in the arms is the exact same as it was in the Elite figure. The head does seem to have less motion, but that’s due to the head sculpt, not the body style. You don’t have the chest articulation from the Elite.


Nor do you have the ball jointed legs, thigh swivels, double jointed knees or the rocker ankles. It’s pretty basic articulation, but given that Big Show is no acrobat, he doesn’t feel as stiff as some of the other offerings in the Basic lineup.

Accessories:
You get nothing.


It sucks when you’re paying $10 (and up to $12 in some locations!) for a figure that doesn’t come with a single accessory. Mattel has been very stingy with the accessories.

Value:
These are some of the cheaper figures on the market these days, but that still doesn’t mean their value is great. Some folks prefer the “Basic” style and others prefer the “Elites”. I’m definitely in the latter camp, but the nice thing is that both types of figures are scaled with one another so you can mix and match if you’re a kid or if they don’t offer your favorite superstar in a particular style. The lack of accessories and weaker articulation make this an okay buy, but not a great value.


Score Recap:
Packaging – 7
Sculpting – 8
Paint – 8
Articulation – 6
Accessories – N/A
Value – 7
Overall – 6.5 out of 10


“Okay, who has to go to the bathroom, raise your hand?”

This is a pretty neat figure, but he’s mostly just a new head sculpt and some good tattoo tampos. As such I can’t give him a super high rating, especially when he is missing a few attention to detail elements like an elbow pad. It’s nice to have a Big Show figure with some hair, though.


“WEELLLLL… It’s a Gaggle of Big Shows!”


Ringside Collectibles has announced their newest Mattel WWE exclusive figure. Ringside does a couple of these a year. The latest is an nWo version of the Macho Man. The first promo shot of the figure went up today.

Personally I love it, but as is typical with these exclusives, the $30 price tag hurts. No word if Macho Man comes with anything more than what’s shown here, but I was a big fan of the nWo era of Macho Man as it revived his career allowing him to become a dangerous and wild heel again. He’ll also go great with the upcoming DDP figure. The Madness was great… Shame he doesn’t come with an alternate Madness shirt.

The big news is that the figure has a new head sculpt. It looks good thus far, but we’ll have to see if without the hat and glasses to know how good it is for sure. You may remember I was critical of the Original Macho Man figure head. It was decent, but not the greatest likeness.

You can pre-order the figure over at Ringside Collectibles now.