Monthly Archives: March 2009

The second half of our look at the “Robots of Death” comes in the form of the D84 “Dum” Robot. The black robots on this mining vessel in the old Doctor Who TV show were the dum robots. They couldn’t speak and could only perform basic labor. Maybe this was some attempt at some statement on slavery? Perhaps it was coincidence? Needless to say I’m sure Reverend Al Sharpton would throw a fit in today’s generation.

Ironically the D84 robot turns out to be anything but “dum” or dumb… He’s actually a undercover agent for the mining company, who was placed on board the miner as a precaution to threats of a robot revolution by a scientist called Taren Capel, who was raised by robots. Got all that? Well it’s sort of important. Eventually D84 helps the Doctor defeat the evil robots and save the day. At the cost of D84’s own life. If you’re keeping a running total at home that’s like the 14th billion person who has died for the Doctor.

Packaging:
Same classic clamshell we’ve been getting all along, nuff said. Look to previous reviews for more information on this package.

Articulation:
The D84 Robot features the exact same level of articulation as the SV7 Robot which includes swivel waist, swivel arm battle grip, swivel thigh, a SECOND lower swivel thigh, swivel wrist, cut arms, cut legs, cut neck as well as knee and elbow joints. This is the first figure to NOT feature the Who Crotch®, despite looking like it has one.

As with the SV7 Robot, this one can stand but it takes some work. I actually had a bit of a harder time getting him to stand, but there isn’t any real plausible reason why.

Sculpt:
The sculpt here is the same as it is on the SV7 model. With no structural differences. The real difference comes in the paint job. This figure is painted a dark black but with light silver and gray touches throughout. Many pictures make this figure’s top half look black… They aren’t! They’re green!

I’m assuming that the actual model was green. D84 had a slight green tint to him in the episode, but because of the film grain it was hard to say for sure. Character Options probably had better shots than I did, so rest assured this is screen accurate.

He also includes stickers so you can make him other models than D84. That’s great. You have four numbers to choose from. My only real issue with that is that we barely ever saw any other “Dum” robots in the episode. Yes, they were there, but most of the episode was V robots. So these stickers should have been included in the SV7 Robot as well. The SV7 could pass for other V robots, whereas it’s much more likely that collectors would only buy ONE D84 Robot. One of the few mistakes in marketing I’ve seen CO make.

Accessories:
Just like SV7, D84 comes with a leg of the K-1 Robot. Unlike SV7 however, D84 also includes an Anti Robot Transmitter. What’s an Anti Robot Transmitter? Well basically it’s a microphone device that the Fourth Doctor whips up using the broken face of a V robot and a control device.

The detail on the Anti Robot Transmitter is very impressive and it even has a well painted back with a variety of sculptural elements. This looks better than it did during the actual television show. Although again, it might have made more sense with the SV7 robot, but I suppose it could go either way.


Back of the weapon.

Additional Notes:
Despite being the same sculpt as the SV7, I find this guy more fun. But I think CO missed the boat on army building as it seems unlikely anyone would buy more than one of this character.

Value:
At about $13 this is a reasonable value, but not necessarily a required buy. You need him for the K-1 part and he’s definitely more interesting than the SV7 robot. In fact D84 was a highlight of the episode, so he’s worth adding to your collection even if you skip SV7.


Recreate your favorite scenes…

Score Recap:
Packaging – 7
Sculpting – 7
Articulation – 7
Accessories – Anti Robot Transmitter, BAF piece
Value – 7.5
Overall – 7.5 out of 10

Despite being the same figure as the SV7 robot, I like this figure better. The black paint makes it stand out more than the silver and the green head gives it a depth that you only see when you get up close. Plus the accessory is flat out cool. D84 was a much more memorable character than SV7 and that’s what takes him just a shade above his robot boss.

You’re in for a double dose of retro Doctor Who characters today here at Infinite Hollywood. First up is the SV7 Robot from the Classic Doctor Who range. These are part of the K-1 Robot build-a-figure series and are in line with the Character Options 5 inch figure range.

The SV7 Robot comes from the classic 1977 “The Robots of Death” series of episodes. In the series, robots are part of a ship broken into three classes. Black “Dum” robots which can perform only menial tasks and can not speak, a light silver-green “Voc” class that perform higher classes of operations and can speak and the SV “Super Voc” which is essentially the captain of all the robots.

Although there are three types of these robots with differing colors, the SV and regular V robots are almost identical in color. One is certainly more green, but this could pass as a regular Voc if you aren’t too picky. As is, this is the SV7 leader robot who eventually is revealed to be working with the evil Taren Capel in an attempt to rid humanity of anything that isn’t a robot.

Packaging:
Same classic clamshell we’ve been getting all along, nuff said. Look to previous reviews for more information on this package.

Articulation:
The SV7 Robot features a wide range of articulation which include swivel waist, swivel arm battle grip, swivel thigh, a SECOND lower swivel thigh, swivel wrist, cut arms, cut legs, cut neck as well as knee and elbow joints. This is the first figure to NOT feature the Who Crotch®, despite looking like it has one.

Despite all the articulation, this figure has some difficulty standing. You can get it to stand, but it could probably use the extra crotch movement because the design forces the legs in tight together which makes it awkward to stand up straight.

Sculpt:
Identical to the real life model. There isn’t much more that needs to be said. The rubbery out clothes of the robot feature the same waffle texture that the real ones had. The only real difference between this figure and the real life model is that the feet here aren’t as obviously wrapped in tin foil! That’s an improvement. The face sculpt is the real winner here with all the intricate details and all the nice sculpting on the hair that really make this robot’s look stand out.

There isn’t a ton of paint, but what’s here is done really well. The shading on the face can’t always be seen to the naked eye, but it’s there. It’s a greener color than the rest of the body. The other minor details are painted nicely and feature a lot of smooth cuts with little glop.

The rubbery clothes continue to be a highlight as the Robo-capris (His shorts) offer a lot of movement thanks to their material. You can’t fully bend the knee, but the fact that you can bend it at all is a treat. Interestingly there is two thigh swivels and that creates a separate break on the upper hip. This means that despite the pants looking like one solid piece, they’re actually three pieces to allow more movement. Great sculpting job there.

Accessories:
SV7 comes with nothing but his BAF part. A large leg of the K-1 Robot. It’d been nice if he’d came with one of the small red buttons that the robots used in the episode to mark “death”, but the accessory would have been really tiny anyway so I can see why it wasn’t included.

Additional Notes:
I honestly thought that the SV7 and regular V robots were the same color on the TV show. It wasn’t until researching this that I realized they were slightly different in color. I could easily see this being used as an army builder figure for the regular V robots.

Value:
At about $13 this is a reasonable value, but not a must have. You really need a small army of these robots to make them interesting and I’m not sure that they’re worth it. They don’t have some of the posing ability that other figures in this range have and the somewhat bland design might turn you away. They were also a real pain to photograph as the shiny silver paint reflected my flash bulb a bit too much.


The Toy…


The Real Thing…

Score Recap:
Packaging – 7
Sculpting – 7
Articulation – 7
Accessories – BAF piece
Value – 7
Overall – 7 out of 10

The SV7 Robot comes from a really entertaining series of episodes. It’s a unique looking robot and it screams 70’s sci-fi as this could easily wander onto some Battlestar Galatica episode and you wouldn’t know the difference. It even looks like it could be in a Star Wars droid scene. That said, this figure isn’t a must have unless you’re looking to beef up your classic collection or trying to complete the K-1 Robot.

Be sure to tune in later today for the SV7 counterpart, the D84 Dum Robot review!

Either due to sheer laziness or a feeling of redundancy, I took a few days off. Doctor Who month continues though with the Sea Devil. I suspect I’ll continue to run these Doctor Who reviews past March, but we’ll see. Let me know if you enjoy them, now on with the review!

The Sea Devil figure is from the Classic Doctor Who Series 1 collection made by Character Options and imported into the US via Underground Toys. The Sea Devils themselves are your typical aquatic creatures as often depicted in sci-fi. They are an advanced race and live in a sort of Atlantis style underworld. According to WIkipedia: They were scientifically advanced, and lived during prehistoric times in an aquatic civilization. At some point, the Moon approached close to Earth, threatening to cause geological upheaval, and both the Sea Devils and the Silurians went into self-induced hibernation to survive.

Interestingly these are villains who first appeared in the Third Doctor’s series. This is interesting because we haven’t gotten a 3rd Doctor yet. Many suspect he’s coming in the often rumored Classic Series 2, but that remains to be seen. If and when we do get a 3rd Doctor, the Sea Devil will be there to do battle with him.

Packaging:

This is the same packaging as featured in the other classic figures. No change here. It remains a suitable package for not only keeping the figure safe but for collectors who want to keep the figure inside. I should note though that one of the twist ties holding him in went through his “shirt” so you might be careful when removing him from the package. I didn’t rip mine, but I could see it happening. Word of warning.

Articulation:

Fish people need lots of articulation. This guy has it to the gills. (*rimshot*) The Sea Devil has Who Crotch®, swivel thighs, swivel forearms, swivel wrist, swivel waist, swivel feet, cut neck, cut arms, cut legs and knee and elbow joints.

This is more than enough articulation to get this guy into all sorts of poses. As an army builder figure, this is important because you can have a small herd school of these guys in a variety of fun poses. Great for dioramas and the like.

Sculpt:

The detail here is actually quite good with an expressive face and large eyes and turtle-like snouts that certainly seems lifelike. It has a sort of bird-esque quality about it. That’s pretty common though as birds and turtles tend to have similar facial structure and this creature seems to be a fish/turtle style. The fins on the feet look nice, though a bit plain but I can’t help feeling that this looks a bit like a rubber suit monster. Of course that’s what it was, so it’s a testament to CO for making it look so much like the on-screen model, for better or worse.


Check out the Disco belt.

The paint is excellent with various brown shadings over a very realistic green. There could have been a temptation to make this more brightly colored in order to make it more interesting, but they stuck with realistic colors. It looks like a fish. Another interesting note is the height of the figure. He’s quite tall. Which is again very screen accurate as the Sea Devils tended to tower over the other actors in the show due to their big heads and long necks.

The soft goods skirt/shirt/dress/toga don’t look as impressive however. It sort of looks like cheese cloth. That’s not to say it isn’t accurate. The actual Sea Devil costumes looked a bit like cheese cloth hospital gowns. It’s just not a flattering design. The addition of the 70’s disco belt doesn’t really make it better either. I think that you could remove the gown if you tried, but I couldn’t find an easy way to do it. The belt comes off easily though.


Try Long John Silvers new Sea Devil Poppers!

Accessories:

The Sea Devil comes with his Heat Ray, which I’m not sure is actually a gun. It fits into the belt and is the belt buckle but can be pulled out and used as a blaster of sorts. The belt is also removable and I assume the costume could count as an accessory. Still out of the package, it seems like he has much of nothing, but once you start to strip him down you can see the accessories.

Since this is part of the build-a-figure series, he includes a piece of the giant K-1 Robot. His piece is dreadfully boring though. It just looks like a big radiator. Or an air conditioner. If you aren’t building the robot, this piece is a waste. But you SHOULD be building K-1 and you can’t build him with out.


An Air conditioner…?

Additional Notes:

I’m not a fan of the Sea Devil so much, but that doesn’t mean this isn’t an excellent figure. DC Collectors should probably pick up a few of these guys if they’re looking for a way to flesh out some Aquaman ranks. They could be enemies of Atlantis or friends. It’s definitely a cool aquatic figure and one of the less popular Doctor Who figs, so it could be put to good use in other areas. Plus he kind of looks like Admiral Ackbar in a way.


While we devotin’

Full time to floatin’

Under the sea

It’s a trap!

Value:

This is one of the cheaper Classics figures and ran me about $11. Despite being a army builder, he’s just not that popular. It could be because the Sea Devils weren’t featured a lot. It could be because of the somewhat mundane design. It could be a clear discrimination against undersea people… Whatever the case at $11 he’s not a bad value, but I also don’t feel the need to amass quantities of him either. If you’re a bigger fan of the characters you might prefer them.

Score Recap:

Packaging – 7

Sculpting – 8

Articulation – 9

Accessories – Disco belt, Heat Ray, BAF piece

Value – 8

Overall – 8 out of 10

Upon reviewing this figure I’ve become more tempted to army build this guy. He’s got all the right parts to make up a great figure, he just lacks the intangible “umph” to put him over the top. Still there aren’t enough figures of underwater monsters and this guy could go good with his brethren.

Either due to sheer laziness or a feeling of redundancy, I took a few days off. Doctor Who month continues though with the Sea Devil. I suspect I’ll continue to run these Doctor Who reviews past March, but we’ll see. Let me know if you enjoy them, now on with the review!

The Sea Devil figure is from the Classic Doctor Who Series 1 collection made by Character Options and imported into the US via Underground Toys. The Sea Devils themselves are your typical aquatic creatures as often depicted in sci-fi. They are an advanced race and live in a sort of Atlantis style underworld. According to WIkipedia: They were scientifically advanced, and lived during prehistoric times in an aquatic civilization. At some point, the Moon approached close to Earth, threatening to cause geological upheaval, and both the Sea Devils and the Silurians went into self-induced hibernation to survive.

Interestingly these are villains who first appeared in the Third Doctor’s series. This is interesting because we haven’t gotten a 3rd Doctor yet. Many suspect he’s coming in the often rumored Classic Series 2, but that remains to be seen. If and when we do get a 3rd Doctor, the Sea Devil will be there to do battle with him.

Packaging:
This is the same packaging as featured in the other classic figures. No change here. It remains a suitable package for not only keeping the figure safe but for collectors who want to keep the figure inside. I should note though that one of the twist ties holding him in went through his “shirt” so you might be careful when removing him from the package. I didn’t rip mine, but I could see it happening. Word of warning.

Articulation:
Fish people need lots of articulation. This guy has it to the gills. (*rimshot*) The Sea Devil has Who Crotch®, swivel thighs, swivel forearms, swivel wrist, swivel waist, swivel feet, cut neck, cut arms, cut legs and knee and elbow joints.

This is more than enough articulation to get this guy into all sorts of poses. As an army builder figure, this is important because you can have a small herd school of these guys in a variety of fun poses. Great for dioramas and the like.

Sculpt:
The detail here is actually quite good with an expressive face and large eyes and turtle-like snouts that certainly seems lifelike. It has a sort of bird-esque quality about it. That’s pretty common though as birds and turtles tend to have similar facial structure and this creature seems to be a fish/turtle style. The fins on the feet look nice, though a bit plain but I can’t help feeling that this looks a bit like a rubber suit monster. Of course that’s what it was, so it’s a testament to CO for making it look so much like the on-screen model, for better or worse.


Check out the Disco belt.

The paint is excellent with various brown shadings over a very realistic green. There could have been a temptation to make this more brightly colored in order to make it more interesting, but they stuck with realistic colors. It looks like a fish. Another interesting note is the height of the figure. He’s quite tall. Which is again very screen accurate as the Sea Devils tended to tower over the other actors in the show due to their big heads and long necks.

The soft goods skirt/shirt/dress/toga don’t look as impressive however. It sort of looks like cheese cloth. That’s not to say it isn’t accurate. The actual Sea Devil costumes looked a bit like cheese cloth hospital gowns. It’s just not a flattering design. The addition of the 70’s disco belt doesn’t really make it better either. I think that you could remove the gown if you tried, but I couldn’t find an easy way to do it. The belt comes off easily though.


Try Long John Silvers new Sea Devil Poppers!

Accessories:
The Sea Devil comes with his Heat Ray, which I’m not sure is actually a gun. It fits into the belt and is the belt buckle but can be pulled out and used as a blaster of sorts. The belt is also removable and I assume the costume could count as an accessory. Still out of the package, it seems like he has much of nothing, but once you start to strip him down you can see the accessories.

Since this is part of the build-a-figure series, he includes a piece of the giant K-1 Robot. His piece is dreadfully boring though. It just looks like a big radiator. Or an air conditioner. If you aren’t building the robot, this piece is a waste. But you SHOULD be building K-1 and you can’t build him with out.


An Air conditioner…?

Additional Notes:
I’m not a fan of the Sea Devil so much, but that doesn’t mean this isn’t an excellent figure. DC Collectors should probably pick up a few of these guys if they’re looking for a way to flesh out some Aquaman ranks. They could be enemies of Atlantis or friends. It’s definitely a cool aquatic figure and one of the less popular Doctor Who figs, so it could be put to good use in other areas. Plus he kind of looks like Admiral Ackbar in a way.


While we devotin’

Full time to floatin’

Under the sea

It’s a trap!

Value:
This is one of the cheaper Classics figures and ran me about $11. Despite being a army builder, he’s just not that popular. It could be because the Sea Devils weren’t featured a lot. It could be because of the somewhat mundane design. It could be a clear discrimination against undersea people… Whatever the case at $11 he’s not a bad value, but I also don’t feel the need to amass quantities of him either. If you’re a bigger fan of the characters you might prefer them.

Score Recap:
Packaging – 7
Sculpting – 8
Articulation – 9
Accessories – Disco belt, Heat Ray, BAF piece
Value – 8
Overall – 8 out of 10

Upon reviewing this figure I’ve become more tempted to army build this guy. He’s got all the right parts to make up a great figure, he just lacks the intangible “umph” to put him over the top. Still there aren’t enough figures of underwater monsters and this guy could go good with his brethren.

One of the reasons I’ve been reviewing so many of the Gelth Build-a-figure characters this past week was so that I could review the Gelth itself. One of the nice things about the Gelth wave is that you only need to buy three figures to complete the core Gelth BAF. Of course the complete Gelth looks a bit nicer, but I haven’t completed it and these are the pieces you’ll likely be after anyway. So I’m cheating a little bit and reviewing this figure as is.

The Gelth were intelligent gaseous life-forms, blue and spectral in nature, who claimed to have lost their corporeal forms as a consequence of the Time War. Or what we in the business refer to as a focused, non-terminal repeating phantasm or a Class Five Full Roaming Vapor.


The complete Gelth… I don’t have the two sides.

Packaging:
N/A

Articulation:
The Gelth features absolutely NO articulation. You can’t move it’s head. You can’t even more the extra pieces that I don’t have. No swivel arm, no Kung-fu grip, not even a Who Crotch®.

Sculpt:
What the Gelth lacks in articulation it makes up in being pretty. It’s made of a translucent plastic and gives an nice glowing effect to the figure. It catches light in a lot of different directions and that makes it fun for what it’s supposed to be. The face is etched in there rather creepily and you can almost see a human inside trying to get out.


Someone call those geeks from the Sci-Fi channel to investigate.

The Gelth is largely 2 dimensional though. It can be turned sideways, but doesn’t look near as good. Of course I suppose a ghost would also be largely 2 dimensional as well, so I can’t fault it much there.


Accessories:
Technically the Gelth is an accessory since it’s a BAF, so it doesn’t come with anything.

Additional Notes:
The Gelth goes good with the actual Gelth zombie figure to make a nice display.

Value:
As an individual figure this would be pretty worthless. If you combine the price of three figures it’s around $36 which this Gelth certainly isn’t worth. However if you look at it that those same figures were released previously for the same price minus the Gelth pieces, you might realize that this figure is essentially free. At that price, you can’t beat it.


All this for $36? Not bad…

Score Recap:
Packaging – N/A
Sculpting – 6
Articulation – 0
Accessories – N/A
Value – 7
Overall – 6 out of 10

I ain’t afraid of no Gelth!

As far as Build-a-figures go, this one is pretty lame. There is no real reason to actively seek out this figure unless you’re a HUGE fan of the Gelth. That doesn’t mean this isn’t a cool piece of Doctor Who merchandise to have to display though. If you already need the figures like Jack, Banna and the Old Doctor, then it’s a real steal. Otherwise you’re not missing out much. I do like that you can build 90% of the figure without getting the whole wave. I’m not sure this works in traditional BAF standards, but as freebie accessories, it’s cool.